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Do you ever use prepaid credit cards to sign up for subscription offers?

There are a few I’m thinking of signing up for on InboxDollars but I don’t want to go through the trouble of having to cancel a subscription. The thing is there are some like the one for LifeLock where it says you can’t use prepaid cards. Do they usually work for most offers in your experience?

7 thoughts on “Do you ever use prepaid credit cards to sign up for subscription offers?

  1. Check out the privacy app – it basically creates a disposable credit card linked to your real info. You can set limits on them, etc.

  2. You need to be careful and make sure you read all of the relevant terms & conditions before you sign up for anything if you’re planning on doing it that way. Just because you use a card they can’t charge anymore may not stop them from keeping the subscription alive for a few more billing cycles, and then sending the balance to collections.

    Prepaid cards and services like Privacy.com are good for sketchy signups where you think they will steal your card data, get hacked, or keep charging you even after you cancel the subscriptions.

    You really need to cancel subscriptions for offers you don’t intend to keep using.

    1. This. If you don’t want to bother cancelling, don’t do these offers. Usually, to use a prepaid card online, you have to register the card. Then the prepaid company can come after you for other charges and overdrafts. Or the subscription can come after you and hurt your credit report.

      And if you’re thinking of just using false info with the subscription and/or the prepaid card, now you’re breaking Terms of Service, and you will get caught at some point. The best outcome then is being banned from the sites and services that let you make this extra money. Now you’ve killed the cash cow.

      Play it straight. Keep screenshots of the terms for the offers you take, both from the GPT site and the final merchant. Take more screenshots when you cancel the subscription if possible. Make a spreadsheet. Make calendar reminders that repeat daily to cancel the subscriptions, and don’t delete that reminder until you know it’s cancelled.

      Privacy.com is a good option to protect yourself, but they’re a little ban happy. I got to use them twice before being kicked off.

      Or consider opening a free checking account like Aspiration just for these offers. So if things go south, they don’t have your main account information. Look around on doctorofcredit.com or r/churning for a free account that will give you a sign up bonus. (Swagbucks is offering a small bonus for Aspiration right now, I think. Plus cashing out from SB to Aspiration is easier than PayPal, and provides a small bonus each time.)

      If it sounds like too much work, just stay away from the offers. Just one subscription going bad can wipe out months of profits, and leave you with a lower credit score.

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